The Rector Writes

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The Rector writes...............April 2017

 

Love Actually

Christians in all lands have walked with Jesus in his suffering and his Passion through Lent and Holy Week.  On Palm Sunday we wave palm branches and shout joyful Hosannas as we remember Jesus entering the gates of Jerusalem.  At Passover we watch as he washes the feet of the disciples and shows us what love can look like.  But the very next day, having lost hope in what we assumed would be a warrior-like king, our emotions turned and we, the crowd, called for his crucifixion.  Then we stood and watched as he took our sin and our suffering to the cross.  We stood at the foot of the cross and there we wondered what had happened to his power, his majesty and his loving Father, but most of all, we wondered what on earth had happened to us.

Soon, in the insanity of our chaotic world, we came to understand how the events of Palm Sunday and Good Friday could easily happen.  An innocent man, murdered by an oppressive power to calm the venom of the mob, is nothing new for the history of the world.  What is more difficult to understand however, are the unfolding events of Easter.  On Easter morning the man who was beaten, betrayed, rejected, denied and abandoned came back.  He came back without hatred, without vengeance, and washed us in the forgiveness he showed us as he washed the dust from our dirty feet.

In the light of the resurrection the Gospel stories begin to make sense, as God restores the one who the world would kill.  The resurrection is the defeat of all powers that seek to deny the hope that Jesus brought into the world.  The resurrection calls us to question what meaning it has for every Christian, every day.  It calls us to examine how we live together in a complex world; a world where it is often much easier to hate than it is to love.  Yet Easter affirms that those who kill and those who hate do not have the last word, for in the story of the resurrection it is God who has the last word, and that last word is love, actually.